How to Fix a Flooded Basement

One of the last things you ever want to see when you enter your basement is a foot or two of water. Unfortunately, pipes burst and storms rage—so you might experience a flooded basement sometime. If you think that’s a possibility, call your Hibbs agent to see if your home insurance policy includes flood protection. That way, when water seeps in, you can rest easy knowing that all of the damage will be covered.

Unfortunately, you’ll still have some work to do even if you have flood coverage. Here are a few tips to help.

 

Shut off the electricity and gas, and then call an electrician.

As we all know, water conducts electricity, so never enter a flooded basement when the power is on. If any electrical equipment got wet, then you should call an electrician to have them removed.

 

Drain the water.

If a busted pipe has caused the problem, shut off your water. Then, you’ve got to get rid of the pool under your house before you can start the cleanup. If you’re lucky, a supply of towels might soak it up or maybe a wet vac. You may even need to use a sump or pool pump. If you don’t have this equipment, call a professional plumber for help.

 

Remove the carpet.

Wet carpet can prevent your floor from drying, so you will need to rip it up as soon as possible. Don’t immediately give up on it, though. Call a carpet cleaning specialist to see if it can be saved.

 

Let the basement dry.  

Use dehumidifiers and fans to help dry a flooded basement as quickly as possible so mildew doesn’t grow.

 

Scrub.

 Clean and disinfect everything. Address the floors, walls, gutters, downspouts, and drains. Remove dirt, twigs, mud, and debris.

 

Place your documents in the freezer.

Stop mildew growth on your important documents by stashing them in the freezer until you can later take care of them.

 

We know it isn’t fun to clean up a flooded basement, and we wish you luck. If the mess is especially bad, you should consider calling a professional cleaning company. Hopefully, this—along with your flood coverage—will ease some of the stress.