Keep Your Home and Vehicles Safe with Our Best Winter Prep Advice

Halloween has ended, and Christmas decorations are already on store shelves. That means winter weather is nearly here. Have you readied your home and vehicles for snow, ice, and cold temperatures? If not, we’ve compiled some of our most helpful advice on winter prep. Just tap the links and get more details from past Hibbs Insurance blog posts!

 

Winterizing Your Home

One of the most basic tasks of winter prep is to take care of your home. Remember to weatherstrip your doors and windows, clean your gutters, inspect your fireplace, check your roof for leaks and debris, and cut tree branches that have grown too close to your home. You should also learn how to keep your pipes from freezing and make sure your family understands what to do in the event of a power outage.

 

Winterizing Your Car

Winter is particularly harsh on a car—especially since road salt can wreak havoc on the undercarriage. So before the cold weather really gets going, check your fluids and your battery, switch out your wiper blades, and perform other basic winter preparedness tasks. Cleaning your vehicle in the cold can also get a bit challenging, so review our tips for a good winter car wash.

Most important of all, you need to understand how to drive on snow and ice. So, make sure you know our winter driving safety tips before you start your car’s engine on a snowy day.

 

Winterizing Your Other Vehicles

Cars, trucks, and SUVs aren’t the only machines that need some winter prep. Every vehicle does, including motorcycles and RV’s. Remember to take care of all seasonal maintenance tasks, so you’ll be ready to ride again in the spring.

 

Winterizing Yourself

Don’t forget to take care of your mental and emotional health this year. The cold season can feel tough because of the decreased access to sunlight. The days are short, and the cold also keeps us mostly indoors, which can cause some people to develop seasonal depression. Remember to eat well, exercise, and generally fight the “winter blues.”